Students from Quirindi High School set the standard in agricultural learning, with a visit from a genetics expert.

Learning: Geoff Steinbeck from Excel Genetics with students from Quirindi High School on Monday. Photo: Supplied.
Learning: Geoff Steinbeck from Excel Genetics with students from Quirindi High School on Monday. Photo: Supplied.

Once again setting the standard as leaders in agricultural excellence, Quirindi High School hosted genetic expert Geoff Steinbeck from Excel Genetics at the school on Monday.

Mr Steinbeck attended the school’s agricultural farm to artificially inseminate the stud cows and to collect semen from a bull on the farm.

Students had spent considerable time in previous classes researching the best genetics suited to each of the eight cows and were able to select a different bulls’ semen for each female being artificially inseminated on the day. Semen used was local and from overseas.

Ag future: Qurindi High School students were learning from one of the best in the business on Monday. Photo: Supplied.

Ag future: Qurindi High School students were learning from one of the best in the business on Monday. Photo: Supplied.

“Genetic traits including frame, growth rates, birth weight, scrotal size, docility and more were taken into consideration when matching a sire to the cows, this process enabled the student’s to really consider the long-term outcomes of breeding livestock,”  Head Teacher of Agriculture, Andrew Harries said.

Semen from the selected bulls was then artificially inseminated into the recipient cows during and agriculture lesson with students encouraged to watch and learn from the process.

Mr Steinbeck, who hails from Tamworth, started his own Angus stud at the age of 12 and has since gone on to become one of the region’s leading cattle genetic experts, travelling the world researching genetics and collecting semen for use.

“His personal career story was something the students found inspiring as they learnt you can follow your passion for Agriculture at any age,” Primary Industries teacher, Holly Sozou said.

Also on the day, Mr Steinbeck collected semen from a bull at the farm.

“Students were able to use visual learning practises from a genetic expert to see how the semen collection process works,” Mr Harries said.

“If students don’t know anything about cattle, they can still undertake the study of Agriculture at the school and be part of the Cattle Team. We encourage learners of all levels.

“The school is delighted to meet students’ desire for future learning and positive outcomes.

“We educate students of all levels and are often led by what we do from the students own interests,” he said.