Tamworth Regional Council consider mobile speed camera unit for Hyman and Johnston St intersection

NEAR MISSES: Council investigated 10 possible options to address community concern about the Johnston and Hyman St intersection. Photo: Gareth Gardner 110917GGA04
NEAR MISSES: Council investigated 10 possible options to address community concern about the Johnston and Hyman St intersection. Photo: Gareth Gardner 110917GGA04

AN “UNSAFE” Tamworth intersection could be soon be manned by a mobile speed camera unit, in a bid to stem the number of near misses.

Councillors will vote on a proposed option for the intersection of Hyman and Johnston streets at Tuesday’s bumper meeting which has close to thirty items on the agenda.

According to a report to be considered by councillors, “there is a local public perception that the intersection of Hyman Street and Johnston Street, North Tamworth is unsafe”.

“Numerous representations have been made to council outlining these concerns.”

Ten options were investigated including installing new signage, changes to traffic-flow, calming measures and changes to the speed limit, but the report recommends councillors endorse the mobile speed camera unit.

“Mobile speed cameras work like fixed speed cameras, but are moved in vehicles from location to location,” the report said.

“Mobile speed cameras are effective because they are unpredictable.

“Their operation creates a general deterrence against speeding, leading to a crash reduction across the whole road network.”

There’s also no cost for council to employ the unit.

Council will also consider an approach made by the Tamworth Aboriginal Medical Service (TAMS) to provide land for the establishment of a new medical centre in South Tamworth in an area of parkland in Hyman Park on the opposite side of Hillvue Rd to the playground equipment.

The estimated cost of the centre is between $4.5 and $5.5 million and would provide a full range of medical and allied health services to the whole Tamworth community. 

“The (TAMS) is looking to build a state-of-the-art facility with at least six permanent general practitioners, a range of specialist services and provide training facilities to compliment current tertiary studies being delivered in Tamworth,” mayor Col Murray said.

“There are a range of benefits this facility proposed by an important community group would bring to South Tamworth, but it’s important for Council to first start a broad community consultation including a letterbox drop to adjoining neighbours.”

The report recommends a community consultation process be undertaken to explain to residents what the medical centre will provide.