Who you can turn to in times of a crisis

SEEKING AID: Anglicare counsellors can help problem gamblers understand their triggers, help them put in place strategies to control and eventually stop their gambling.
SEEKING AID: Anglicare counsellors can help problem gamblers understand their triggers, help them put in place strategies to control and eventually stop their gambling.

MANY of us will experience an intense difficulty, or danger, at some point in our lives.

But there are a number of professional, non-judgmental organisations that can help us through such crises.

Anglicare Northern Inlandprovides confidential counselling for people who have a gambling problem and assistance with financial counselling. 

The organisation’s financial counsellor specialises in helping families or individuals where gambling may have impacted on their ability to pay household bills, or where debt has become uncontrolled.

Counsellors can help problem gamblers understand their triggers, help them put in place strategies to control and eventually stop their gambling.

About 95,800 of Australia's "pokies" are in NSW, a state total only beaten by Nevada, which operated 181,109 gambling machines in 2014, and of course is home to Las Vegas.

“In NSW, we spend nearly $9 billion every year and that number is increasing each year,” Anglicare Northern Inland chief executive Veronica Rodenburg said.

“It’s no wonder that gambling is pervasive and so are the problems associated with gambling; debt and poverty, family disquiet and breakdown, neglect of children and the ‘demons’ the gambler lives with.” 

For more information, phone 6701 8200.

Homes Northis a not-for-profit organisation committed to providing secure, appropriate and affordable rental housing for people on low to moderate incomes, who are otherwise disadvantaged in gaining access to, or maintaining, tenancies.

It has 1021 properties across the district under a range of programs.

“Homes North works closely with many support agencies to ensure the sustainability of our clients’ tenancies,” operations manager Richard Innis said.

“About 23 per cent of our tenants require the assistance of a support agency to live independently.”

Family referral workers at Pathfinders aim to "break the cycle" of difficulties that can occur between vulnerable children, young people and their families.

The service is in Bridge Street, Tamworth.

Pathfinders' Family Referral Service will connect clients with organisations that will meet their needs. You can either phone or drop into the office if you need help and support in overcoming domestic violence, mental health problems and drug and alcohol abuse.

"The service is free and is funded by the NSW Government as part of its Keep Them Safe action plan to improve the safety and wellbeing of children," regional program manager Tania Willis said.

"Family referral workers are accessible, responsive, professionally trained and take the time to listen and assist you in identifying your needs."