Rooster owner sees red again

IT WAS the marketing mismatch that ruffled feathers with customers and even had the store’s owner seeing red.

Just before Christmas, the Red Rooster sign on Murray St underwent a radical makeover, changing from its traditional red to a curious shade of copper-brown.

COLOUR CORRECTED: Red Rooster Tamworth franchisee Tony Bishop with the fast food outlet’s new ‘colour correct’ red signage.  
Photo: Gareth Gardner 050514GGA03

COLOUR CORRECTED: Red Rooster Tamworth franchisee Tony Bishop with the fast food outlet’s new ‘colour correct’ red signage. Photo: Gareth Gardner 050514GGA03

Part of a company strategy to make the brand appear more “classy”, the change went down like a soggy nugget with customers.

After taking up the battle with head office, Tamworth Red Rooster franchisee Tony Bishop finally had a victory last week, with a new bright-red sign being installed.

“It’s the most feedback I’ve had from customers on an issue in my 10 years here and people really felt it wasn’t right,” Mr Bishop said.

“The copper sign might have looked classy but it wasn’t red.

“I was like a dog with a bone and I’m happy that I finally got my wish.”

Tamworth graphic designer Marlon Dalton said the “psychology of colour” was a critical part of branding.

“Colour is something we are immersed in completely during our waking hours and yet we seldom think of the effect on our mood or feelings,” Mr Dalton said. 

“Advertising professionals are only too aware of the psychology behind this and they have been utilising the phenomenon for many years.

“The colour red is well known to be a stimulator of hunger and you will find that a great number of drive through and roadside takeaways attempt to utilise this on us as we pass by their locations. 

“It is very possible that if you have a successful formula and you move away from this by adopting a colour shift incorporate signage this may have an effect on your bottom line.”

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