Tamworth council will use bore water to irrigate Bicentennial Park's Number One Oval and Tamworth Regional Playground

COP A SPRAY: Council's Jules Fleck, Ian Lobban, Paul Kelly and Adam Jones. Photo: Peter Hardin
COP A SPRAY: Council's Jules Fleck, Ian Lobban, Paul Kelly and Adam Jones. Photo: Peter Hardin

WORK smarter, not harder is the goal of Tamworth Regional Council’s new approach to irrigation.

Treated drinking water has been used to keep Tamworth’s Bicentennial Park Number One Oval looking lush and green, until now.

Work is about to start on council’s largest water sustainability project with groundwater irrigation.

Water Sustainability Officer Ian Lobban said the initiative will save 110 homes worth of consumption per year.

“There is a financial saving, it’s a five to six year payback with $50,000 in savings each year,” he said.

“That could be 110 new housing developments or existing homes that could use that water.”

That could be 110 new housing developments or existing homes that could use that water.

Ian Lobban

The new system will service Tamworth Regional Playground and the Number One Oval.

And, since September 2016, projects at 14 other sporting facilities and parks have led to a saving of 163 megalitres – that’s about 20 Olympic pools full of drinking water.

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The project will cost $300,000 to complete, water will be collected in two pumps and then used to maintenance the area.

Councils sport and recreation manager Paul Kelly said it was decided to put the tanks underground as they’re in a high profile area.  

“By moving to an underground supply with less reliance on a potable supply of drinking quality water, that enables us to future proof for times where there is drought, even if we’re restricted we can keep our green spaces tidy, clean and green,” Mr Kelly said.

Bore water isn’t restricted during drought in the same way potable water is.

Under council’s drought management plan drinking water is restricted at level four, but groundwater doesn’t come under that.

Allocations of bore water can be restricted by the state government.

The first stage of work will be to remove the brick workshop building in the car park, the car park will be closed while the work is in progress.

It’s anticipated that once the brick building is demolished, more parking spaces will be added.

The installation of the bore water pumps will start on Tuesday.

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