Steps to reduce spraying risks: Gordon

Inversion watch: Low overnight wind speeds (less than 11 km/h), delta T values below 2 and predictions of dew or frost all indicate the likely presence of a surface inversion. Photo: GRDC
Inversion watch: Low overnight wind speeds (less than 11 km/h), delta T values below 2 and predictions of dew or frost all indicate the likely presence of a surface inversion. Photo: GRDC

Amidst cotton groups calling for greater restrictions on the use of 2-4,D after December spray drift in the Walgett region that’s set to cost growers millions, spray application expert Bill Gordon said there were several steps growers or operators could take to minimise off-target movement of spray. 

“Growers can control the when, where, how and what of spray application, the only thing they really can’t control is the weather and then they need to access reliable forecast information so they only apply products at times of lowest risk,” Mr Gordon said.

He said growers needed to choose products carefully, understand the product’s mode of action and and read the crop protection product label for guidance on spray quality, buffer (no-spray) zones and wind speed requirements. 

“Always expect surface temperature inversions will form later in the day, as sunset approaches, and they are likely to persist overnight and beyond sunrise on many occasions,” he said.

“If the spray operator cannot determine that an inversion is not present, then no spraying should occur.”