Woolomin residents fear for safety after second fatal dog attack

Devastated: Daniel Boland, Eve Richardson, Krissy Boland and Bruce Patterson have lost their beloved family pet Smokey after a dog attack, and are now demanding action as they fear a person could be next. Photo: Peter Hardin
Devastated: Daniel Boland, Eve Richardson, Krissy Boland and Bruce Patterson have lost their beloved family pet Smokey after a dog attack, and are now demanding action as they fear a person could be next. Photo: Peter Hardin

A tragic incident in Woolomin has one grieving family calling for action, following the death of their pet whippet, Smokey, just seven months after the same Alsatians allegedly killed a neighbour’s Jack Russell.

The first incident saw two of the three dogs classified as “menacing” by Tamworth Regional Council.

The Council said the third dog would now be declared “menacing” and the owners issued with a fine, for “failing to comply with the menacing dog control requirements”.

The attack was on private property.

On Friday, Krissy Boland was at her parents’ home and went to relay a message to their neighbours, and “friends of forty years”.

“They opened the screen door to speak to me and the three dogs came flying at me – I thought I was dead,” Mrs Boland said.

What she didn’t know is that Smokey had followed her.

The three Alsatians inflicted grievous injuries to the pet, which had to be put down shortly after.

Krissy’s mother Eve Richardson, and son Daniel, hearing the attack next door, feared the worst. 

“I heard the screaming and those dogs and thought Krissy will be dead by the time we get there,” Mrs Richardson said. “I am petrified of those dogs - too scared to even go in my backyard.” 

A wooden barrier installed on the Woolomin Public School grounds between the Alsatian's yard fence and the school playground.

A wooden barrier installed on the Woolomin Public School grounds between the Alsatian's yard fence and the school playground.

The family has been left devastated, and Bruce Patterson is demanding action.

“If they (the dogs) killed a sheep they would be put down, but (the owners) haven’t even come around and said sorry. Everyone is terrified of those dogs, and they live next to the school,” he said.

The Leader contacted the dog’s owners, but they refused to comment.

TRC Manager Regulatory Services Ross Briggs said council actions were limited by the “complicated circumstances,” and said “there is no reason to think these dogs pose any ongoing safety risks to members of the public”.

“Council can take action if a dog is not secured inside the property where it is kept or has displayed unreasonable aggression towards a person or animal,” Mr Briggs said. “However, the act also gives dogs the right to protect the property where they are kept.” 

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