Tamworth bats: Tamworth Regional Council says there is no way of knowing if the bats will return next year

Battling bats: The 150,000 strong colony of bats has reduced to around 50,000, and council expect most of the remaining ones to also soon leave. Photo: Peter Hardin

Battling bats: The 150,000 strong colony of bats has reduced to around 50,000, and council expect most of the remaining ones to also soon leave. Photo: Peter Hardin

The winter of bats might soon be over according to Tamworth Regional Council, as the army of flying foxes, that have called the city home for the past six months, take flight.

Going batty: The city was inundated with a huge colony of Grey Headed Flying Foxes this year, although council said there is no way of telling if they will return.

Going batty: The city was inundated with a huge colony of Grey Headed Flying Foxes this year, although council said there is no way of telling if they will return.

Manager of Regulatory Services Ross Briggs confirmed that the population has already dropped from the peak of 150,000 to under 50,000 already, and is expecting most of the remaining bats to evacuate as well.

“I have no idea where they are going, but they generally move on when their food supply is running low and they can still carry their young, and before the big heat of Summer,” Mr Briggs said. A few thousand will probably stay along King George and Bicentennial Park, but they are generally pretty quiet.” 

Tamworth has had giant colonies of bats in 2012, 2015 and 2017, with smaller populations in between, and Mr Briggs said there is no way to predict whether they will be back next Autumn or not.

Educational signage is being constructed over summer “to inform the community about the bats – why they are important and what they do.”