Happy herb growing

Growing green: A little effort can provide you with a good supply of herbs for your kitchen.
Growing green: A little effort can provide you with a good supply of herbs for your kitchen.

In many gardens that I have visited in Australia, I have found some of the most popular herbs such as rosemary, lavender, sweet bay, parsley or chives.

The size and location of your garden should be considered when planting herbs. Several plants of forage e.g. chives, fennel, mint, parsley, rosemary, sage, sorrel, tarragon and thyme will provide a varied collection which can be used in salads and cooked dishes.

A sunny position that is also sheltered from frost and wind is advisable when planting herbs.

Ideally, the ground should slope slightly towards the north so that those herbs requiring more sun can be planted at the top and those needing a damper position should be planted at the bottom. Ensure they are not covered by taller plants.

Most herbs will thrive in well-drained soil. Many, including marjoram and thyme, will flourish in alkaline soil which is the Ph scale of soil in Tamworth. Angelica, bergamont, chamomile, chervil and mint prefer heavier soil. Adding manure, dolomite and compost to the soil aids in preparing the ground.

Propagation of herbs is applied by three basic methods (see the story at right).

The Queen of Sheba who is said to have taken seeds of balsam as a gift to King Solomon in Israel as well as scented bushes from seeds grown in Jericho.