Pint of Science second leg kicks off in Tamworth

TASTEFUL TOPIC: Dr Peter Hunt from the CSIRO (right) will be talking parasites at Wests, pictured with researcher Dr Tracy Schumacher from the University of Newcastle. Photo: Gareth Gardner 080517GGA02
TASTEFUL TOPIC: Dr Peter Hunt from the CSIRO (right) will be talking parasites at Wests, pictured with researcher Dr Tracy Schumacher from the University of Newcastle. Photo: Gareth Gardner 080517GGA02

TAMWORTH has got the taste for science and local academics are hoping to serve up more regular feasts for the public.

Organisers from the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health were very happy with the Tamworth turnout for the first night of the Pint of Science event at Wests Leagues Club on Tuesday night.

Tamworth based dietetics lecturer Emma Bohringer said more than 80 people attended the event last night which delved into research around sleeping and eating.

The second leg of the event tonight will shift focus to animal and pet health.

Dr Yolanda Surjan from the University of Newcastle will be talking on cancer treatments for humans which have been translated to animals. 

The CSIRO’s Dr Peter Hunt will speak about the ever-changing implications of parasites in animal health.

Ms Bohringer said there are still tickets available online and at the door for tonight’s event.

“This event is aimed at the public, so you don’t have to be a scientist to come along,” Ms Bohringer said.

The lecturer told The Leader local academics have been “encouraged by the interest the public has shown in science”.

While it is early days, Ms Bohringer the interest did present a great opportunity for the department of rural health to host similar events down the track to boost local interest in health and science.

“We already do a lot for high school students, bringing them through the labs and showing them equipment,” she said.

“We could look at whether there are other age groups that would be interested.”

The feedback received from the first leg of Tamworth’s Pint of Science found the region were particularly interested in getting more informed on health research, Ms Bohringer said.

She said resources, mining and agriculture were other fields attendees were interested in.

Scientists take the pub test

TWO scientists walk into a bar with a jar full of parasites.

It might sound like the start of a joke, but science has often battled to get its message across to the masses, so now it is being taken out of the labs and in to pubs. No joke. Read more.

Armidale’s round

TURNS out, we’re not all human.

We’re a hybrid species, thanks to the trillions of microbes that live in and on our bodies.

Microbiologist Gal Winter explained the science that makes us extra-special.

“It’s fairly recent that we learned the human body would have more microbial cells than human cells, that’s shocking, about 100 times more.

“It’s crazy if you think about it, because we all know we have cells in our bodies, we all have DNA and that’s what makes us who we are in some ways. Read more.