Over 500 students learn about waterway preservation at EcoFestival

Planting the seed: Landcare's Hamish Campbell shows Timbumburi students Talia Summers, Riley Leys and Emily Milo how to plant a tree at the Peel Wetlands during this week's EcoFestival. Photo: Peter Hardin 160517
Planting the seed: Landcare's Hamish Campbell shows Timbumburi students Talia Summers, Riley Leys and Emily Milo how to plant a tree at the Peel Wetlands during this week's EcoFestival. Photo: Peter Hardin 160517

Over the past eight years over 2500 local primary school students have learnt first hand about the importance of waterways and the preservation of local environments.

This week another 514 students from ten different schools are getting involved in the EcoFestival at the Peel Wetlands in Coledale.

President of the Peel Wetlands Landcare Group Beth Ross-Ward said that the festival teaches some of the most valuable preservation lessons to year four children every year.

“It is about preserving our precious environment – over 50 per cent of wetlands have been re-claimed or destroyed,” Mrs Ross-Ward said. The awareness that it is threatened, and that the consequence that we are threatening ourselves.” 

The children work their way around several different stations including water filtration, water bug detectives and analysis, recycling, reducing and re-using, as well as a tree planting station.

“We have planted over 1000 trees and plants,” Mrs Ross-Ward said. It is important to form habits and skills early to preserve the future.”