Spreading Tamworth's tree change message

DINING BOOM: Evocities ambassador Michael Hansen said Tamworth was a fantastic place to live and it was up to us to sell the message.
DINING BOOM: Evocities ambassador Michael Hansen said Tamworth was a fantastic place to live and it was up to us to sell the message.

ANYONE who lives in Tamworth knows it’s not a one-horse town, but how does the city get that message out there? 

Tamworth has banded together with other major regional cities to form Evocities, a group dedicated to spreading the good word about living outside a metropolitan area. Many of the region’s skilled workers are leaving the city and businesses are struggling to fill the gap they leave.

Evocities Tamworth ambassador Michael Hansen said people who made the tree change to Tamworth were always surprised by professional networks that exist within the city.

“Quite often in cities you become a lone wolf trying to progress your career,” Mr Hansen said.

“But when you move out to places like Tamworth, everyone is really supportive.

“Everyone is interested in developing and growing your career or businesses, because they understand the benefits to the community when everyone gets ahead.”

The social side of the city is also rapidly growing. “We’ve seen a crazy amount of restaurants open up in the last 12 months and that’s reflective of the way Tamworth is developing,” Mr Hansen said.

The city’s appeal is “quite broad”.

“You could be someone that’s worked hard all your life and is ready to escape rat race, or it could be a young family, who doesn’t want to raise their kids in the city,” Mr Hansen said

“Even a young, single go-getter, who wants to get ahead.”

“Often once people get here, they don’t want to leave. I just spoke with someone who was only here for a two-year posting – that was over a decade ago and he’s still here, because he loves Tamworth.” While organisations like Evocities and Tamworth Regional Council are working hard to get the word out, Mr Hansen encouraged everyone to help sell the message.

“Some people find it hard to believe we’re not a one-horse town,” he said.

“It’s up to us to talk it up. For a city of our size, we have huge benefits.”