Mental health: It’s ok to talk about it

IT'S OK TO TALK: CentaCare provisional psychologist Matt Milne says the number of people seeking help is on the rise. Photo: Peter Hardin 141016PHA13

IT'S OK TO TALK: CentaCare provisional psychologist Matt Milne says the number of people seeking help is on the rise. Photo: Peter Hardin 141016PHA13

MORE people in the Tamworth area are seeking help for mental health concerns than ever before.

As National Mental Health Week closes, Centacare New England North West has reported an increase in people seeking help.

 Provisional psychologist Matt Milne said Mental Health Week was an opportunity for residents to reflect on their own mental health and that of friends and family.

“Based on the increasing number of referrals we are receiving, more people are seeking help in our area – which is great. As a result more people are going to be exposed to mental illness,” he said.

“ it’s important that we have conversations with the ones we love about how they are going, particularly if they are showing warning signs of mental health illnesses, he said.

“ Those signs can include spending increasingly more time alone, crying more often, increasing alcohol or drug use, taking more time off from school or work or out of the ordinary changes to their sleep, eating or activity levels. If someone tells you that something is wrong, listen to what they have to say and support them to seek professional help.”

Mr Milne said issues from stress and anxiety at work or home to grief and addition to drugs and alcohol were among the issues people were seeking help for.

“We find that issues people seek help for can range from stress or anxiety at work or home, to grief of the loss of a loved one to problems with alcohol or drug addiction. No two people are the same and what might be bearable or manageable for one person may not be for another.”

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