Tamworth Powerstation Museum to fire up historic steam engines

READY TO RUMBLE: Tamworth Powerstation Museum will have its John Fowler steam engines firing for visitors to see on Friday and Saturday. From left,  retired boiler operator visiting from Gladstone, Qld, Allan Pease, Powerstation volunteer Chris Lowe with steam engine operators Arthur Ruttley and Steve Bailey. Photo: Gareth Gardner 210116GGB05
READY TO RUMBLE: Tamworth Powerstation Museum will have its John Fowler steam engines firing for visitors to see on Friday and Saturday. From left, retired boiler operator visiting from Gladstone, Qld, Allan Pease, Powerstation volunteer Chris Lowe with steam engine operators Arthur Ruttley and Steve Bailey. Photo: Gareth Gardner 210116GGB05

THINGS are heating up at the Tamworth Powerstation Museum where locals and visitors can see two stationary, historic steam engines all revved-up, with nowhere to go.

The only two operating John Fowler steam engines in the world will be open and firing for the public to see on Friday and Saturday and to get insight into the role Tamworth played in powering northern NSW.

The next chance people will get to see the engines powered up will be on November 9, when the museum celebrates the anniversary of the first electric street light in Australia being switched on in Tamworth in 1888.

The museum is also home to 20th-century electrical appliances, technical instruments and a pictorial history about the early development of electricity.

Visitors can also see another relic from the past with The Morsecodians, a group of retired telegraphists, showcasing their skills at the museum until Saturday.

The Morsecodians are giving the public a taste of old-style communication with a crafty set-up allowing people to send a telegram anywhere in Australia at the cost of a gold-coin donation.