Family’s charity blossoms after promise

VOW FULFILLED: Shanin Phillis, her mum Sue Phillis and aunt Cathy Tiberi met lots of people and raised quite a bit of money for the Cancer Council at their stall outside Target. Photo: Gareth Gardner 220814GGB01

VOW FULFILLED: Shanin Phillis, her mum Sue Phillis and aunt Cathy Tiberi met lots of people and raised quite a bit of money for the Cancer Council at their stall outside Target. Photo: Gareth Gardner 220814GGB01

SELLING products for the Cancer Council is a mission, a joy and a promise for sisters Sue Phillis and Cathy Tiberi and Sue’s daughter, Shanin.

Sue and Cathy lost their brother and father to cancer and when Cathy contracted cancer and beat it, they made a solemn vow.

“My sister is a cancer survivor and we’re all pretty proud of her,” Sue said.

“My vow to her when she got better was that we would give back, to the community and to the Cancer Council, so we’ve been running these Daffodil Day stalls for a few years now.”

The sisters’ stall outside Target in Peel St went pretty well, too.

TASTY TREATS: Hospitality students Eliza Stevenson, Dylan Ramsey and Georgia Hartley with their tasty creations for Daffodil Day. Photo: Barry Smith 210814BSC02

TASTY TREATS: Hospitality students Eliza Stevenson, Dylan Ramsey and Georgia Hartley with their tasty creations for Daffodil Day. Photo: Barry Smith 210814BSC02

“Considering there are stalls outside the council building, in City Plaza and in Centrepoint, it’s been really good,” Sue said.

“The big sellers were footballs, badges, pens and, of course, daffodils. We get a few regulars who collect the bears, too. For some people, it’s become a tradition, and the stories from people – everyone has their own about who they’re buying for and why – are just lovely.”

Meanwhile, it was the little things that meant the most at the TAFE New England campus, with tiny cupcakes making a big difference to the lives of people living with cancer.

Ten certificate II hospitality students put their culinary skills to good use, making more than 100 cupcakes.

They were sold, along with Daffodil Day merchandise, on the campus yesterday.

Creating the sweet treats was no chore for student Eliza Stevenson.

“It’s lovely to have the chance to be involved in something like this,” Eliza said. 

“It’s close to my heart. Cancer has touched the lives of people I know and care about. 

“In the end, it’s only a small thing we’re doing, but if everybody did something small, we could make a big difference.”

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop