Residents concerned over subdivision plan

CAUSE FOR CONCERN: Daruka Rd residents, from left, Pam Sutton, Anthony Wallace and daughter Ella, Noel Abra and John Allen are worried about plans for a new 72-lot subdivision in their neighbourhood. Photo: Gareth Gardner 040814GGG09

CAUSE FOR CONCERN: Daruka Rd residents, from left, Pam Sutton, Anthony Wallace and daughter Ella, Noel Abra and John Allen are worried about plans for a new 72-lot subdivision in their neighbourhood. Photo: Gareth Gardner 040814GGG09

RESIDENTS claim their homes will be put at risk from raging floodwaters if a proposed 72-lot subdivision in Tamworth is approved.

The Daruka Rd residents fear plans to convert nearby undeveloped land into a concrete jungle could prove disastrous for people downstream.

Building company Hibbards is seeking approval to construct more than 80 single and dual-occupancy residences on land at 67 to 85 Daruka Rd in North Tamworth.

The project is firmly aimed at first and second home buyers, with blocks ranging in size from 600sqm to 1200sqm.

But some local landowners have lodged written objections with Tamworth Regional Council detailing a litany of concerns, including that the development could exacerbate flooding.

Daruka Rd homeowner John Allen said residents who attended a neighbourhood meeting on the weekend were pushing for Tamworth’s councillors to vote against the project.

He said those in attendance were adamant the development application did not contain adequate measures to contain water as it flowed from the property to the Peel River.

“Local residents have already experienced significant damage to properties as a result of flash flooding,” he said.

“In the past, the volume of water draining from the development site has caused major erosion and exposure of council assets, namely sewerage and drainage pipes.

“It is inevitable that the hard surfacing of the proposed estate will result in increased concentration and velocity of water and increased damage to local properties and those properties downstream.”

Mr Allen said the group had also identified other areas of concern stemming from the development that, if completed, would bring an estimated 320 new residents to the area.

He said population density, traffic issues – including a greater risk to students travelling to and from school – and lack of pedestrian access were all raised.

Public consultation on the development application has closed and the matter will go before council at a later date.

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