Drink drought ends for ‘dry Julyers’

THIRSTY WORK: Quirindi’s Angus Fraser survived his third ‘Dry July’ and says he is a better man for it. Photo: Barry Smith 300614BS02

THIRSTY WORK: Quirindi’s Angus Fraser survived his third ‘Dry July’ and says he is a better man for it. Photo: Barry Smith 300614BS02

THE big dry is finally over and locals all around the region will be flocking to their favourite watering holes this weekend for some much-anticipated hydration.

But those who had the intestinal fortitude to give up the grog and have a “dry” July are being urged not to undo all their good work in a few frenzied sessions.

Accredited practising dietitian Chris Jarrett, of Rural Fit in Tamworth, has warned it is quite 

likely that 31 days off the drink will have diminished people’s alcohol tolerance.

“If they go back to doing exactly what they did a month ago, they might actually find they get a bit sillier a bit quicker,” he said.

“So, be a bit cautious and perhaps take it easy and try not to get into that attitude of making up for lost time.

“Perhaps take the attitude that you want to build on all the positives that you’ve got over the past month and try to moderate your drinking.

“For a lot of people it’s probably been a good month to reflect and review and reset what is normal, or desirable, for that individual when they go back to consuming alcohol again.”

Quirindi’s Angus Fraser is a veteran “Dry Julyer”, having completed his third in succession on Thursday without a transgression.

The 23-year-old, whose abstinence has seen him raise about $250, and counting, for the North West Cancer Centre, said he was a healthier man for the experience.

“I definitely do feel better,” he said.

“I’ve lost about 4kg in the last month, so that’s definitely helped.

“This year was easier but I ended up breaking my hand playing rugby, so for two of the weekends I was sitting at home doing nothing.”

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