TRLX complex turns one today

HAPPY BIRTHDAY: It was business as usual at the Tamworth Regional Livestock Exchange yesterday for its end of financial year store sale, but a little time was found to acknowledge the facility’s first birthday. TRLX employee Maddy Coleman grabs the champagne while Simon Burke (TLSAA), Dan Greenwood (TRLX), Chris Paterson (TLSAA) and Nathan McConnell (TLSAA) look on. Photo: Barry Smith 270614BSB02

HAPPY BIRTHDAY: It was business as usual at the Tamworth Regional Livestock Exchange yesterday for its end of financial year store sale, but a little time was found to acknowledge the facility’s first birthday. TRLX employee Maddy Coleman grabs the champagne while Simon Burke (TLSAA), Dan Greenwood (TRLX), Chris Paterson (TLSAA) and Nathan McConnell (TLSAA) look on. Photo: Barry Smith 270614BSB02

IT’S 12 months today since the grand opening of the Tamworth Regional Livestock Exchange (TRLX), but yesterday it was business as usual.

In the year since it was officially opened by NSW Minister for Primary Industries Katrina Hodgkinson the $17 million, 39ha facility has yarded 126,371 cattle and 248,844 sheep for a total sale value of $71 million.

Tamworth Livestock Selling Agents Association (TLSAA) president Angus Newcombe said despite some initial apprehension, the upgrade from the old saleyards had been extremely positive and the past year had seen a concerted effort by the 10 agents under the TLSAA banner to capitalise on the opportunities provided by the new complex.

He said agents and farmers had embraced the state-of-the-art facilities with new vendors each sale and buyers regularly travelling from across the state, impressed by features like non-bruise panelling and soft flooring throughout to minimise stress, reduce shrinkage and improve meat quality, as well as raised walkways for clear sight of livestock.

“We want to grow our businesses and this new facility helps to do this,” Mr Newcombe said. 

“The more cattle and sheep we get, the more buyers and the better prices we can achieve for our clients,” he said.

The saleyards employed almost 50 people every sale day, Mr Newcombe said, and that combined with the attendance of farmers and agents from outside town created a significant flow-on for the regional economy.

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