Forget tradition – it’s issues that matter

KINDLY allow me space in our fine paper for me to air my views, political affiliations and suggestions regarding election issues.

First, to all New Englanders: we are a democracy and we each love our country and hopefully, like myself, respect one’s right of choice re elections.

It is with pride that I declare my loyalty to our honourable Prime Minister Julia Gillard and my local member for New England Tony Windsor. I don’t back losers.

Reading the nasty, undeserved comments in The Leader regarding vicious attacks leaves me with much sadness and disgust.

I’m one who seeks knowledge on issues. I never miss things like Question Time in the House of Representatives, Meet The Press, 7.30 and National Press Club speeches. I want to know why and what I may be voting for. I’ll not differ.

Watching and listening to the Coalition and their behaviour and lack of policies, I can only say bitterness and negativity for me is a no-no. 

To me, Mr Abbott, leader of the Opposition, displays as a frantic, fanatical person besotted with wanting to become our next prime minister.

Certainly if I thought he was capable, he would be my choice. His appearance in budgie smugglers doesn’t help matters.

We, as a country, need better than this. I am by birth, on both maternal and paternal sides, a seventh-generation Australian. 

Australia and its people are embedded in my soul.

In regard to previous local elections, a defeated candidate, someone whom I once admired as one of the nicest gents,  despite being defeated by the people (yes, you and me) was front page of The Leader with a vicious look who declared angrily “I will not be defeated.” 

I still have the huge front-page photo. I was shocked. Four years later this person is our candidate.

I implore fellow New Englanders to take stock and at least know what they are voting for in this next election.

It’s obvious from my observances and through The Leader letters page, that writers don’t know or care and at times vote on personalities, innuendo and tradition, e.g., the way the males in their family always voted. Tradition is not good enough. It’s issues that count.

We all need to know who and why we vote. Voting is our future. Think of our children. Parliamentarians on both sides – stop playing games and get on with it.

And New Englanders. Make your vote count.

IRIS MAHONY

TAMWORTH

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