Watch what you eat and go as hard as you can

THE ham is finished, the turkey is gone and the taste of trifle is fading away. Once again it’s time to lose the Christmas bulge.

Whether it was the roast meats, the delicious desserts or the celebratory drinks, many people are now looking to the gyms, bikes, and running tracks to remove the excess gift they picked up over the holiday season. But the professionals all agree that the key is not only exercise, but more importantly, watching what you eat.

Personal trainer Eli Latsinos recommends having a Christmas and New Year period of feasting, celebrating and relaxing, yet remaining vigilant throughout the rest of the year.

“Don’t watch what you eat and drink between Christmas and New Years, watch what you eat and drink between New Year’s and Christmas,” Eli said.

Mother and daughter team Wendy and Courtney Hathway were back at the gym on Wednesday trying to punish the Christmas pounds, and planned on going every day of the school holidays to start the new year healthy.

“We have had nothing but roast lunches and dinners, followed by trifle and pavlova while lying by the pool. By the time you visit family and friends you almost eat a year’s worth”, Wendy said

Paul Posa, another early gym returnee  who claims to have eaten roast pork, lamb, ham, and beef at Christmas, believes he can knock the holiday calories with one simple self-designed three-hour session, which he says burns 2200 calories.

According to personal trainer and rugby league fitness coach Mick Schmeidel, this may not be the best option.

“Short, sharp sessions are the way to go, if you’re going to train, train hard. Watch what you eat and your calorie intake, remember anything in a packet is bad for you,” Mick said.

Professional personal trainer and fitness guru Mandy Lord agrees with an intense training regime to drop the festive weight and keep fit, but also to remember Christmas is only one day, not three or four weeks.

“Go hard for as long as you can, recover, then go hard again, and remember to do the things you like. It doesn’t have to be heavily regimented, this time of year be active with your family, go to the park and run around.” Mandy said.

Paul Day was back training again on Wednesday and had even managed to drag his kids along for some fitness and activity, keeping them healthy and ready to go for next year.

Paul had boldly tried to keep fit throughout the festive season saying that he had been training fairly hard right through after starting a fitness kick early in the year.

“Lemon meringue pie and ham could have been my downfall, also too much beer and too much cheer, but I managed to keep going,” Paul said.

Personal trainer and masseuse Nick Reid said the most important thing now was to drop the sugar out of the diet again and get back to your regular routine as quickly as possible.

“Stop the sugar intake: the lollies, chocolate, and especially the beers. Unfortunately, alcohol can affect your weight and health dramatically. Get away from the sugar and back to the fruit and veg,” Mr Reid said.

He also recommended people who are starting out to begin moderately with a combination of cardio and weights, but also to have fun while doing it.

“Play with the kids, and their new toys, try not to get them just iPods and things like that for Christmas, but toys that will get them out enjoying the sunshine and running around.”

As Christmas turns to New Year’s and we welcome in 2013 remember that the experts have weighed in and the general synopsis to get fit and healthy again is to get back to your regular routine as soon as possible, drop the ham, trifle and booze, do exercise that you enjoy with your family, and most importantly watch what you eat, stay away from sugar, and stick to the outside aisles of your supermarket focusing on fresh fruit and vegetables. 

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